Finca Santa Cecilia

One of the farm visits I was most excited about was a return visit to Finca Santa Cecilia, a farm run by a family with one sister and 3 brothers each operating their own farms, but all working together to produce fantastic coffee. This is also the farm where I first met two young ladies who were close to my own daughters age and were also twins. There was an instant connection with the family, and I’m happy to say it continued during our visit. We arrived early morning, so of course, breakfast was the first order of the day.

It was an amazing way to start the day. We then toured the farm and were astounded at the volume of coffee hanging on the trees. The branches were loaded.

The farm is quite diversified as well. They have chickens for eggs and eating, plantains, bananas, yucca, and a few avocado trees. They also grow another plant that is used for making the jute bags that coffee is shipped in. The leaves are cut off the plant, then shredded and dried to prepare them.

This clip give you an idea of the process. Not many work safe policies in place, but no one lost any digits while we were there.

The coffee from Finca Santa Cecilia makes up 70% of the Colombia Rainforest Alliance Santander that I always carry. The other 30% comes from another farm just down the road run by the Rosso family. Here again we met the family who owns the farm and manages the harvest. And of course, we had some amazing fruit as well. Here in Canada, what we call dragon fruit is nothing at all like Colombian dragon fruit. The Colombian version may be my favorite fruit of all time. Incredibly sweet and juicy.

After visiting the farm, we made a quick stop at a coffee warehouse that was preparing for the harvest season to begin. The warehouse would see 5 million kilos of coffee come through during the year. Each coffee is cupped and graded before being prepared for milling and shipping. 20181010_175543